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February 15, 2010

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Comments

Sidburgess

Great piece. It is amazing to see the different cities and how they have succeeded and failed at providing adequate access for non-car owners to public areas.

Mike

But, Wauwatosa is a suburb! So are Shorewood, Whitefish Bay, and Cedarburg, who also have pedestrian friendly (and interesting) downtowns.

Fortunately not all suburbs are of the ilk of Franklin or Brookfield.

John Michlig

Mike, you are absolutely correct. The "inner ring" suburbs built before WWII were actually put together pretty nicely -- they were PLANNED in the very real sense of the word. I grew up in one: Wausau.

The more strictly correct word for more recent suburbs, which are often no more than collections of arbitrary subdivisions, would be "exurbs"; however, the term "suburb" is simply less complicated to use regularly.

Dave M.

Had a similar experience in Wauwatosa last month. Just for the record, the dual shots of my own corner of suburban hell show Rawson and 76th, not Drexel.

John Michlig

Thanks, Dave - correction made. I had "Drexel" on the brain.

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